Manitoba

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Fri
27
Apr

Are Canadian legalization laws too strict?

Are Canadian legalization laws too strict to be worth the effort?

Legalizing marijuana in Canada will benefit millions of people. First and foremost, people will no longer be incarcerated for minor possession charges. This means fewer arrest records, less government spending on prisons and less longterm impact on the careers and lives of those caught with marijuana. Legalization does, however, vary province by province, and come with a host of bureaucratic complications. Are Canadian legalization laws too strict? Here’s a closer look at the problems marijuana legislation, as it exists today, could cause.

Strict Laws Require Bigger Law Enforcement Budgets

Thu
26
Apr

Quebec wants to clarify its right to prevent home cultivation of cannabis

The Quebec government is calling on the Senate to amend the federal bill to legalize cannabis for recreational use to make it clear that provinces have the right to forbid home cultivation.

Quebec’s Minister Responsible for Canadian Relations, Jean-Marc Fournier, told a Senate committee Wednesday that his government wants all legal cannabis to be grown by federally licensed producers, at least in the initial stages of legalization.

Tue
24
Apr

Delta 9 marks 4/20 by obtaining license for cannabis oil production

DELTA 9 CANNABIS INC. (TSXV: NINE) ("Delta 9" or the "Company") is pleased to announce that Health Canada has approved the Company's application for an amendment to its cannabis production and sale license which will allow it to produce bottled cannabis oils under the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (the "ACMPR"). The license amendment was issued on April 20, 2018 and is valid until August 30, 2019. "This is another important step for Delta 9 in preparing for legalization in Canada, but also in working with our partners in Germany, where we have signed an export agreement," said Delta 9 CEO John Arbuthnot.

Fri
20
Apr

Guide to legalization predicts home-grown pot will be biggest municipal headache

Municipalities will have to grapple with a host of thorny issues once recreational cannabis is legalized in Canada — but it's the matter of home-grown marijuana plants that's expected to cause them the biggest headaches.

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities has developed a guide to legalization, released Monday, to help identify the challenges and regulatory options for dealing with them that municipal governments across the country will face once the prohibition on cannabis use is lifted later this year.

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Thu
19
Apr

Delta 9 enters into partnership with Westleaf Cannabis Inc. for development of Alberta facility

Delta 9 Cannabis Inc. (TSXV:NINE) ("Delta 9" or the "Company") is pleased to announce that it has entered into a limited partnership agreement with Westleaf Cannabis Inc. ("Westleaf") and Delta West Inc. for the joint development of a large-scale cannabis production facility located in Southern Alberta (the "Project"). The entering into of a non-binding letter of intent in connection with the Project was previously announced by the Company on January 24, 2018. Delta West Inc. acts as general partner of the limited partnership formed by Delta 9 and Westleaf.

Tue
20
Jun

As Canadian Provinces Seek the 'Right' Price for Pot, How It's Sold Could Matter

Taxation isn't the only factor in the quest to undercut black market prices.

Provincial finance ministers are getting a clear message from the federal government this week: Keep taxes on legal marijuana sales consistently low across Canada, or risk undercutting the government's goal of ending black market cannabis sales.

But provincial governments may find that enticing consumers to buy legal marijuana over illicit weed will take more than just tweaking tax rates. The question of how provinces allow marijuana to be sold could also play an important role in pricing.

Mon
27
Mar

Manitoba pot bill a 'slap in the face' to medical marijuana users, protesters say

Around a dozen people met on the stairs of the Manitoba Legislature on Saturday to protest a new bill proposed by the provincial government that would change the rules on cannabis.

Bill 25, the Cannabis Harm Prevention Act, was introduced on Monday. It would put restrictions on cannabis similar to those on alcohol, banning people from consuming it in a vehicle and giving police the right to suspend a driver's licence for 24 hours if they thought the person was under the influence of the drug.

Tue
21
Mar

Manitoba Wants to Set Limit on Marijuana Consumption in Public Places

The Manitoba government is moving to set restrictions on marijuana similar to those on alcohol.

Proposed legislation would list marijuana as an intoxicant and ban people from consuming it in a vehicle.

Police would also have the right to suspend a driver's licence for 24 hours — similar to an alcohol provision — if they thought a person was under the influence of pot.

Medical marijuana user and legalization advocate, Steven Stairs said he is disappointed by the proposed legislation.

He called it overly broad and said it fails to distinguish medical marijuana use from recreational consumption.

Mon
20
Mar

Winnipeg opens cannabis education centre, hosts convention

It could be as early as this year that you could walk into a store and purchase marijuana legally.

“It would only involve Health Canada regulated products, and they would be on display,” Derek Ogdan, president of National Access Cannabis said.

The new cannabis education centre opened in Winnipeg on Friday with the purpose of answering questions and connecting clients with a doctor. Ogdan said despite popular belief, the average age of their clients across the country is 41-years-old, and they prefer to use oils rather than smoke the substance.

“They take a dropper, use a dropper and take the exact amount that they want so there’s consistency. And then they’ll use that perhaps every evening,” Ogdan said.

Thu
16
Mar

Canada: Manitoba Bill Will Help Police Crack Down On Marijuana-Impaired Drivers

The Manitoba government is set to introduce legislation to help police crack down on drivers who are high on marijuana.

Justice Minister Heather Stefanson says the bill, expected Thursday, will also include measures dealing with health and safety concerns stemming from the expected federal legalization of pot.

Stefanson hasn't provide details in advance of the bill's presentation, but says the aim is to have checks and balances for when marijuana becomes legal.

She says technology that would let police officers test drivers for pot impairment is still being developed, and the bill will propose different tools for law enforcement.

One in 10 drivers tested had drugs in their system

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