California

Mon
03
Jul

Big Pharma losing grip as study shows nearly 100% cannabis users give up Rx pain meds

‘A landmark study helps explain why Big Pharma is so afraid of the medical benefits of cannabis. The pharmaceutical and alcohol industries, both powerful influences in Washington, have long lobbied against cannabis legalization in order to protect their profits.

The recent study is lending credibility to the idea that medical cannabis can be used as a natural alternative to prescription pain medications, with nearly 100 percent of respondents saying they believe cannabis is helping them decrease their use of prescription opioids to treat the pain.

Mon
03
Jul

California may not suffer same pitfalls as Nevada with recreational marijuana, but still plenty to learn

The line of people outside Blüm Reno extended around the building's front and partially down its side.

About 65 customers stood at 8:45 a.m. Saturday outside the South Virginia Street marijuana dispensary, waiting for the front door to open. No longer restricted to medicinal cannabis only, the dispensary had opened at midnight that day — the exact first moment it could legally sell recreational cannabis under Nevada law. It remained open for about six hours and closed briefly before again opening at 9 a.m.

Some customers, eager for the first chance to buy recreational cannabis, shouted out how many minutes remained until opening. Fifteen, then nine, then five.

Mon
03
Jul

Terra Tech Corp (OTCMKTS:TRTC) surviving the shakeout

Terra Tech Corp (OTCMKTS: TRTC) appears to be one company that might survive the cannabis industry shakeout. 2016 was a stellar year for companies in the fast-growing cannabis industry, but 2017 has turned out to be much tougher than originally expected. Take the case of Terra Tech Corp (OTCMKTS: TRTC), which was a microcap darling in 2016, but has fallen on harder times in 2017.

Thu
29
Jun

California to Require All Marijuana to be Lab Tested. What Will Happen to Weed That Fails the Lab?

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the state’s proposals for the required lab testing of cannabis. If passed as written, all marijuana products will be examined in licensed laboratories for moisture content, pesticide presence, and other elements before it can be sold to the public.

For some dispensaries across California, these regulations may significantly change the way they do business. But in Berkeley, where the city mandated strict testing in years ago, it’s more or less par for the course.

Wed
28
Jun

The Bespoke High Is the Future of Marijuana

A California company makes weed vaporizers to suit every mood—here’s what happened when I tried them.

I’d been traveling for work—to Europe then to Asia then to Europe again while pinging back-and-forth from L.A. to New York. For months my carryon contained the sneakers that I didn’t use in the hotel gyms I never visited. I was exhausted to the brink of tears since previous to this spate of travel. I had a schedule so rote I could give myself jetlag by sliding lunch up half an hour.

Thu
22
Jun

SF's ‘green rush’ for new cannabis stores — and a growing opposition

The small Leland Avenue commercial corridor in San Francisco’s Visitacion Valley neighborhood has two nail salons, two dry cleaners, three convenience stores and a couple of Chinese bakeries.

Pretty soon it could have two medical marijuana dispensaries, as well.

In a trend that is fueling land-use fights in neighborhoods across the city, working-class Visitacion Valley has become the latest focus for cannabis entrepreneurs looking to take advantage of the so-called “green rush” that gained momentum after California voters last year approved Proposition 64, which legalized the recreational use of marijuana.

Thu
22
Jun

Palo Alto takes on marijuana outdoor, commercial growth ban

Palo Alto’s ban on outdoor marijuana cultivation likely will be extended through 2018, or at least until city leaders sort out some policies.

If Palo Alto does not prohibit commercial cultivation by Jan. 1, marijuana businesses can get a state-issued license and open here, according to deputy city attorney Tim Shimizu.

California voters in November approved Proposition 64, or the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, which makes it legal for anyone 21 and older to smoke marijuana.

The law also allows possession of up to 28.5 grams of marijuana, eight grams of concentrated marijuana and six marijuana plants for personal use, as well as legalized commercial cultivation of marijuana. Six marijuana plants are allowed in a greenhouse if locked and enclosed.

Wed
21
Jun

Six Ways California's New State Law Will Change the Cannabis Industry

California lawmakers’ approval of the state budget on last week came with a piece of attached legislation with major implications for the cannabis industry, which is in its first year as a fully regulated business sector.

SB 94 – which passed with a 31-to-3 vote – essentially merges the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act and Proposition 64, the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, into one regulatory framework that will govern both medical and recreational cannabis use. The budget rider bill, along with the rest of the budget, is currently awaiting the governor’s signature.

Wed
21
Jun

Humboldt Cannabis Tours: Cannabis Tourists May Visit Grows, Sample Buds

Come this fall, tourists and curious locals may be able to hop in a van, visit local cannabis farms, purchase primo bud and soak up Humboldt County’s multi-generational marijuana culture during day-long tours.

McKinleyville entrepreneur Matt Kurth is launching Humboldt Cannabis Tours, which promises “to provide the most fun, educational and authentic cannabis experience available.”

“It’s like wine tours, but cannabis,” Kurth said.

Tourists will be able to see how Humboldt County’s No. 1 cash crop is grown and will have an opportunity to sample the wares.

Wed
21
Jun

Not So Green: How the Weed Industry Is a Glutton for Fossil Fuels

Producing a few pounds of weed can have the same environmental toll as driving across America seven times – harming cities’ and states’ plans to curb emissions.

As he opens the steel door to the jumble of his office, located in a cloistered warehouse on the west side of Denver, Paul Isenbergh is barking down the phone about a duplicitous business rival. He’s wearing a shirt and rust-colored tie. Yards from his desk, rows of drying cannabis plants are strung up on two clothes lines.

Isenbergh spent 30 years as a real estate broker in Florida. When he moved to Denver in 2011, he didn’t even know medicinal marijuana was legal in Colorado. 

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