Recreational Marijuana News

Synonyms: 
lifestyle
recreational
Fri
21
Sep

Coke and cannabis: The big guys are muscling into this new market

Coca-Cola is the latest major corporation to make a move into the cannabis industry. Expect more in the coming years.

Fri
21
Sep

Pot legalization bringing boon to hemp farmers

The federal government’s end to its 95-year pot prohibition will also be a boon for hemp producers. They’ll soon be allowed to sell the plant’s flowers to be processed for its CBD, a cannabinoid without any psychoactive effects that’s being hailed for its medicinal potential.

Health Canada approved an exemption last month allowing commercial hemp growers to harvest flowers and leaves to be dried and stored on their farms ahead of Oct. 17, when the sales ban on those portions of the plant will be lifted. Only the stalks, seeds and stems can be sold now.

“That’s a brand new revenue stream,” Canadian Hemp Trade Alliance executive director Ted Haney said.

Fri
21
Sep

What does Canada's incoming marijuana law mean for drivers?

Can I smoke pot and drive? What happens if I'm caught high behind the wheel? How will police test for drug impairment?

With just weeks until Canada becomes the second country in the world to legalize recreational use of marijuana, many questions remain unanswered about how the move will affect drivers.

CTV News teamed up with two medical cannabis users and the Delta Police Department in an effort to get the answers.

"It's given me my life back," said Cheryl McIntyre, who has been using cannabinoid oil on a daily basis since November to calm her tremors and deal with other chronic illnesses.

McIntyre said she doesn't drive after consuming cannabis and is worried about more people driving high once recreational use of the drug is legalized.

Fri
21
Sep

Hicks on Biz: What will buying pot look like after it's legal?

Somehow I had this vision of Alberta’s new legal pot stores (as of October 17, 2018) being like a Bulk Barn, where you would scoop your favourite cannabis buds out of a bin, fill your baggie, weigh, pay at the cashier then home you’d go to roll joints.

Nope, nope, nope.

While we are soon to embark on the Wild West of legalized marijuana, this Wild West comes with rules as decreed by Health Canada, the province, the Alberta Gaming, Liquor and Cannabis Commission (AGLC) and municipalities.

I toured Alberta pot-retailer-in-waiting Fire & Flower’s concept store on Jasper Avenue West. This is no Bulk Barn.  It’s more like an Apple or a Nike store. Spotless, modern, art on the walls, display merchandising, no loose pot to be seen. Definitely no bins of pot buds.

Thu
20
Sep

What you need to know about K2, aka ‘cannabis on acid’

With over 29 years of experience in alcohol toxicology, forensic scientist James Wigmore says calling K2, ‘synthetic marijuana’ is a complete misnomer. “It bears more in common with drugs like LSD. It’s more like a psychedelic, and can, at best, be described as ‘cannabis on acid’.”

Frequently sold in the black market and in less legally-regulated smoke shops, synthetic cannabinoids are psychoactive designer drugs that can either be sprayed on dry, smokable plant materials or sold as liquids for vapourizing. Their widespread use has become a public health nightmare in recent years.

Thu
20
Sep

How to talk to your kids about cannabis

With the Oct. 17 legalization of cannabis looming, many parents are at a loss about how best to approach the issue of pot usage with their kids — and about the place, if any, for the newly legal substance at home.

“I’ve been thinking about it for quite a while, about how to start broaching the topic,” says Ainslie, a Sudbury mother of two who did not want her full name used.

“I don’t know what to say,” she says, adding that her eldest child, now 12, is keenly aware decriminalization is coming. Ainslie’s uncertainty is being felt in countless homes across the country, says Dr. Karen Leslie, an adolescent medicine specialist at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children.

Thu
20
Sep

Get paid to smoke weed? Yes, this is happening in Canada

A cannabis firm is looking to hire five pot aficionados from across the country to sample the company's wares and get paid to do it.

Toronto-based company AHLOT is offering $50 an hour to five "cannabis connoisseurs" to sample various strains of marijuana.

With legalization scheduled for Oct. 17, the bud brain trust will form the company's officially titled Cannabis Curation Committee, reporting back on characteristics and quality.

AHLOT says the canna-committee will help determine what pot products go into its sample pack, which will comprise several strains from various licensed producers.

Thu
20
Sep

Get paid to smoke weed? Yes, this is happening in Canada

A cannabis firm is looking to hire five pot aficionados from across the country to sample the company's wares and get paid to do it.

Toronto-based company AHLOT is offering $50 an hour to five "cannabis connoisseurs" to sample various strains of marijuana.

With legalization scheduled for Oct. 17, the bud brain trust will form the company's officially titled Cannabis Curation Committee, reporting back on characteristics and quality.

AHLOT says the canna-committee will help determine what pot products go into its sample pack, which will comprise several strains from various licensed producers.

Thu
20
Sep

Alberta won't permit cannabis lounges until edible products are regulated

Albertans hoping to spark up in a cannabis cafe or lounge will have to wait until edible cannabis products are regulated, says the province.

In a statement, the province said while they await more information on an easy-to-eat pot product, they will be ready to regulate brick-and-mortar consumption sites at a later date.

Health Canada has set a prospective date of October 2019 for the sale of edible marijuana products.

Ward 3 Coun. Jyoti Gondek said a lack of government communication has caused issues that could have been prevented. “My thoughts haven’t changed much over the entire time we have been having this debate,” she said.

Wed
19
Sep

Canada’s military is using weed goggles to simulate what it’s like to be high

In a boardroom at the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces headquarters in Ottawa, Christian Lizotte was ready to toss some balls.

He held a tray of black, red, and orange balls in one hand; on the table beside him rested a pair of black goggles similar to ski goggles. But this isn’t actually a game, and these goggles, when combined with certain activities, are meant to simulate the effects of being stoned on cannabis without actually consuming it.

Lizotte, a health promotion specialist at the armed forces, turns to his colleague, Laura O’Dell, and instructs her to catch only the black ones without the goggles or, so to speak, sober. “Clear?” he asked. “All right, let’s do this.”

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