Alberta

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Mon
18
Nov

Country's first craft cannabis co-operative ready to take root in Taber

Grasslands Taber Cooperative CEO Lindsay Blackett, a former Alberta PC government cabinet minister will start the country's first cannabis cooperative ready to take root in Taber on Thursday, November 14, 2019. Darren Makowichuk/Postmedia

As grain elevators tumble to time, a terminal accepting cannabis shipments could soon be a replacement on the southern Alberta prairie.

That’s the goal of a group behind what they say is the country’s first craft cannabis collective, one that’ll host growers, processors, researchers and other links in the pot production and supply chain on 25 hectares of land in Taber.

Fri
15
Nov

Aurora halts construction of two cannabis facilities to conserve cash

Aurora Cannabis Inc. is halting construction of two production facilities to save over $190 million as part of a plan to strengthen its balance sheet.

The Edmonton-based cannabis producer says it will immediately cease construction of its Aurora Nordic 2 facility in Denmark to save about $80 million over the next year.

The company will also indefinitely defer completion of construction and commissioning at its Aurora Sun facility in Medicine Hat, Alberta to conserve $110 million.

Once completed, the Aurora Sun facility will be the size of 21 football fields and 50 per cent larger than its "Aurora Sky" operation at Edmonton International Airport.

Fri
15
Nov

Country's first craft cannabis cooperative ready to take root in Taber, Alberta

As grain elevators tumble to time, a terminal accepting cannabis shipments could soon be a replacement on the southern Alberta prairie.

That’s the goal of a group behind what they say is the country’s first craft cannabis collective, one that’ll host growers, processors, researchers and other links in the pot production and supply chain on 25 hectares of land in Taber.

“It’s like a concept of rural Alberta, raising a barn,” said Grasslands Taber Cooperative CEO Lindsay Blackett, a former Alberta PC government cabinet minister.

“It’ll operate like a cooperative — people can do it without it costing an arm and a leg, they can get their feedstock and they don’t have to leave the grounds.”

Thu
14
Nov

‘Hard to fathom’: Disastrous cannabis rollout cost Ontario $325 million compared to Alberta: analyst

Mistakes were made.

Canadian provinces went their own way when establishing a legal framework for cannabis and some have found considerably more success than others.

The Cannalysts, an independent analysis firm, released data this week showing that if Ontario had followed Alberta’s model, the province would have stimulated an extra $325 million in economic activity. On a yearly basis, the analysis notes, the province is missing out on around $488 million more, in addition to $75 million in taxes.

Thu
14
Nov

Alberta to tax cannabis growers

Cannabis growers in Alberta are about to be hit with higher taxes.

The province is changing the rules, so pot producers are no longer treated like farms, which pay zero in municipal taxes.

Municipal Affairs Minister Kaycee Madu made the announcement Wednesday at the Rural Municipalities of Alberta (RMA) convention.

“This change responds directly to the concerns of municipalities, who asked for this distinction in provincial tax regulations. While cannabis is a burgeoning industry, it is important that cannabis-production facilities, which are heavy users of municipal services, pay their share for those services.”

Wed
13
Nov

Solar panels energize Edmonton cannabis facility

Edmonton-area Freedom Cannabis will be growing cannabis using energy partly generated from what it claims is the biggest rooftop solar panel installation in the country.

“It’s an exciting time for all of us to see all our work come to fruition and to be sharing this milestone together,” said Troy Dezwart, executive director and co-founder of Freedom Cannabis, who will flip the ceremonial switch on Tuesday.

A total of 4,574 solar modules energized in the next few weeks will produce a maximum capacity of 1,830 kW for the company’s 126,000 square foot facility in Acheson, 20 kilometres west of Edmonton. It cost $2.6 million, and took about 2-1/2 months to install.

Tue
12
Nov

City of Calgary's pot-related costs soar to $10 million: admin report

As the total number of licensed cannabis stores in Calgary has soared higher than any other Canadian municipality, a new report shows the city has incurred more than $10 million in related costs since it started preparing for legalization.

The report, scheduled to be presented at council’s community and protective services committee on Wednesday, discusses the economic impact of legalization on city coffers. Since 2016, city administration has spent $3.6 million in cannabis-related costs while Calgary police have incurred approximately $6.7 million, as of Sept. 30.

The city’s total bill of $10.3 million far exceeds the $3.84 million in one-time funding provided to Calgary through the province’s Municipal Cannabis Transition Program, according to city data.

Mon
11
Nov

If Ontario sold pot like Alberta, here's how much it would have made

Sluggish cannabis retail in Canada’s largest province has been a sore point for everyday pot consumers and billion-dollar licenced producers alike since recreational legalization over a year ago. 

Provinces charted their own course in establishing legal alternatives to the black market, resulting in a patchwork of public and private channels for online and brick-and-mortar sales. No two markets are as often compared as Ontario and Alberta. 

One key difference is the fact that Ontario has opened just 24 physical cannabis stores versus about 300 in Alberta, a province with roughly 10 million fewer residents.

Thu
07
Nov

Pot regulations around signage frustrating for Alberta cannabis retailers

There are five cannabis stores in Lacombe – a city of about 14,000 people.

That means promoting your business is important, says Matt Panelli, co-owner of Merry Guanas.

The store is located on 49-B Avenue, a “side street,” which means it would be useful to have a billboard or any type of sign that would direct customers to the store, he explained.

But that’s nearly impossible with new regulations imposed by Health Canada. The rules, which kicked in Oct. 17, require retailers to have billboards no larger than 300 square centimetres – about the size of a half page of printer paper.

The Alberta Gaming, Liquor and Cannabis agency is responsible for enforcing the regulations.

“That is tiny,” said Panelli.

Tue
05
Nov

Edmonton city councillor calls for more cannabis laws ahead of edibles rollout

Edmonton city councillor Mike Nickel thinks towns across the country are neglecting regulations for cannabis cafes.

“Cannabis lounges are going to come,” he told Global News. “No other place in the country right now, I don’t think, has enabled in their bylaws the concept of a cannabis lounge, so we’re breaking new ground here.”

Council will debate Nickel’s motion in their upcoming meeting on Tuesday.

“If it’s a legitimate product, then we have to see it consumed responsibly,” he said.

“This is an opportunity to talk about how we can grow some business in town.”

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